14 February, 2010

Guns and Butter - Obama's Republican Class War Presidency

Guns and Butter - Obama's Republican Class War Presidency - February 3, 2010 at 1:00pm
157.22.130.4
http://aud1.kpfa.org/data/20100203-Wed1300.mp3
"Obama's Republican Class War Presidency" with financial economist, Michael Hudson, on Obama's State of the Union Speech and its economic consequences.  The reappointment Federal Reserve Chairman, Ben Bernanke.
http://www.kpfa.org/archive/id/58336


 Guns and Butter - The International Impact of the Chinese Cultural Revolution - January 27, 2010 at 1:00pm
http://www.kpfa.org/archive/id/58146
http://157.22.130.4/data/20100127-Wed1300.mp3
http://aud1.kpfa.org/data/20100127-Wed1300.mp3
"The International Impact of the Chinese Cultural Revolution" with authors, Ann Tomkins and Robert Weil.  Ann Tomkins talks about her personal experience living and working in Beijing during the first five years of the Cultural Revolution, in which she was first an observer, and then a participant. Robert Weil discusses some of the reasoning that led to the Cultural Revolution, which was a revolution within a revolultion, and some of the enduring ideas about people and society that it spawned.

http://www.kpfa.org/archive/id/58530
Guns and Butter - The New Junk Economics: From Democracy to Neoliberal Oligarchy
"The New Junk Economics:  From Democracy to Neoliberal Oligarchy" with financial economist and historian, Dr. Michael Hudson.  We discuss the Federal Reserve; money as debt; Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke's misconception of the causes of the great depression of the 1930's; classical political economy versus anti-classical, so-called "neoclassical", economics; the labor theory of value; the dollar carry trade; government deficit spending; Greece.
http://aud1.kpfa.org/data/20100210-Wed1300.mp3

more guns and butter archives: http://www.kpfa.org/archive/show/complete/34
"Guns & Butter" investigates the relationships among capitalism, militarism and politics. Maintaining a radical perspective in the aftermath of the September 11th attacks, "Guns & Butter: The Economics of Politics" reports on who wins and who loses when the economic resources of civil society are diverted toward global corporatization, war, and the furtherance of a national security state.Produced and hosted by Bonnie Faulkner.E-mail Bonnie at blfaulkner[-at-]yahoo.com


KPFB live stream 16kbit
http://www.kpfa.org/streams/kpfb_16k.m3u
http://aud1.kpfa.org:8080/icy_0
http://157.22.130.4:8080/icy_0
THE ARE PLAYING ZAPPA-eske 1970s sound just now ;-)  "in the army now"   right way wrong way my way

The band's name is The Valadiers --  were motown's first white group

I don't know what a Valadier is,” Stuart Avig confesses "I think it had something to do with being a brave warrior, brave Roman, something like that. The group was already named that when I joined it."

Valadier's Piazza del Popolo, however, incorporated the verdure of trees as an
essential element; he conceived his space ...

Greetings
This is Uncle Sam
I want to take you
To a far off land

I need you
Oh, I need you
Yes, I need you
To lend a helping hand

Said goodbye
To all my buddies
Say hello
To your new friends
'Cause you're in the army now
And your new life has just begun

I need you
Oh, I need you
Yes, I need you
To lend a helping hand

I can just see me now
With a rifle in my hand
I'm gonna have to say
Goodbye to my girl
And I hope she doesn't
Find another man
And baby, baby
While I'm away
Please, please write everyday

Oh no, no
Please don't take me, Uncle Sam
You're in the army now

Goodbye, baby
So long, friends
Goodbye, baby
I hope to see you again

I need you
(Come on, boy)
Oh, I need you
(We're gonna make a man out of you)
Yes, I need you
To lend a helping hand
(This one training
You're not gonna miss)

Come on, boy
Whatta mean you've never heard of KP
I don't care if it's 4 in the morning
There is a right way
A wrong way
And there's my way
You'll do it my way

Come on, boy
On the double
Get in step, boy
Come on, now
March, march

Your mama's a long ways off, boy
So stop your crying
March
Get in step, boy
Left, right
Left, right
I said get in step, boy
Left


Group Members:

 
Stuart Avig, Jerry Light, Art Glasser, Martin Coleman




Formed: 1959, Detroit, MI
Disbanded: 1964
Genres: Rhythm & Blues

Biography The Valadiers formed in Detroit, MI, in 1959; Stuart Avig (lead), Martin Coleman (lead, bass, baritone), and Art Glasser (second tenor) went to Oak Park High, and Jerry Light (bass, baritone) attended Detroit Mumford. Early influences include Jerry Butler & the Impressions, the Dells, the Flamingoes, and Jackie Wilson. They auditioned at Hitsville USA one day after high school, secured a three-year contract, and became Motown's first white group.

Their initial recording session produced "Nothing Is Going to Change It," and "Somebody Help Me Find My Baby," which Motown shelved. Nothing happened until their next session that produced the self-written "Greetings, This Is Uncle Sam," and "Take a Chance," the B-side. According to Avig, "the sessions took one or two hours for both the vocals and the music." The Valadiers wrote "Greetings," but everyone wanted a piece of the songwriters' credits, the 45 listed only P. Bennent -- who nobody knew -- as the songwriter. When it appeared on a compilation album, the credits listed Robert Bateman, Brian Holland, and Ronnie Dunbar. B.M.I. lists Bateman, Holland, Dunbar, and the Valadiers as the writers. "Greetings" was popular in the East and the Midwest, but never sold enough copies to classify as a hit.

The Valadiers appeared in Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Flint, Baltimore, Washington, and other cities with the top names in R&B. On a memorable show at the Cleveland Arena with Marv Johnson, the Isley Brothers, and Wilbert Harrison, the blue-eyed soul singers received a louder ovation than the Isleys. They enjoyed playing hometown spots like the 20 Grand Lounge and the Graystone Ballroom. Lead, Stuart Avig, a 5'4" dynamo, had voice that was a cross between Jackie Wilson and Smokey Robinson; his showstopping voice and demeanor wowed audiences.

The Valadiers' next recordings appeared on the Gordy label. "When I'm Away" (released the summer of 1962) and "I Found a Girl" (January 1963) received little promotion and there were no other releases, and they disbanded by 1964. The Monitors redid "Greetings" on Soul Records and out-charted the original. The Isley Brothers also cut a version that remained in Motown's vaults until the mid-'80s. Stuart cut some solo tracks at Golden World Records as Stuart Ames. He tried to bring Marty Coleman along but the owner, Ed Wingate, only wanted Stuart and squashed the record in its promotional stage. He recorded some tracks, uncredited, with the Reflections ("Just Like Romeo and Juliet") on Golden World.

After that experience Stuart sang around town in various clubs solo, or as the Valadiers, when he could assemble a group. Coleman concentrated on songwriting; B.M.I. lists 38 songs by him, but he wrote more. His biggest was "If This Is Love (Than I'd Rather Be Lonely)" by the Precisions on Drew Records. He wrote and arranged for Detroit's Top Dog label, owned by Artie Fields, and remain with the company until it folded after 11 single releases.

One of Marty's Top Dog songs, "Together We Can Make Such Sweet Music," was redone by both the Spinners and the Supremes & the Four Tops on Motown; Joe Towns recorded the original on Top Dog. When Motown absorbed Top Dog, Coleman fell in as a staff writer, placing tunes with the Originals, Gladys Knight & the Pips, and others. Britisher Ian Levine recorded the Valadiers in the late '80s. Stuart Avig was the sole original member, the other spots were filled by stand-ins. The material ran the gamut and included remakes of the Spinners' "Love Don't Love Nobody," the Isley Brothers' "I Guess I'll Always Love You," and the Miracles' "Ooh, Baby, Baby" with Stuart sounding as good as ever.

Light lives in St. Augustine, FL, while Glasser, Avig, and Coleman all reside in the Detroit area. Avig, happily married for 30 years, has two sons and works in the precious metals business. Glasser also works in greater Detroit, but the once talented Coleman is dogged by substance abuse problems. Stuart has fond memories of Motown and calls it "a rewarding experience." ~ Andrew Hamilton, All Music Guide

Greeting ( This Is Uncle Sam)
Because I Love Her
Youll Be Sorry Someday
I Found A Girl
While I'm Away
Take A Chance

YouTube - The Valadiers-You'll Be Sorry Someday
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIdRFUwkYhQ

HISTORY

 The Valadiers
 The Valadiers formed in Detroit, MI, in 1959; Stuart Avig (lead), Martin Coleman (lead, bass, baritone), and Art Glasser (second tenor) went to Oak Park High, and Jerry Light (bass, baritone) attended Detroit Mumford. Early influences include Jerry Butler & the Impressions, the Dells, the Flamingoes, and Jackie Wilson. They auditioned at Hitsville USA one day after high school, secured a three-year contract, and became Motown's first white group.

Their initial recording session produced "Nothing Is Going to Change It," and "Somebody Help Me Find My Baby," which Motown shelved. Nothing happened until their next session that produced the self-written "Greetings, (This Is Uncle Sam)," and "Take a Chance." The Valadiers wrote "Greetings" and it became very popular on the East coast and the Midwest. It has been rated as the 100th best Motown track ever recorded!

 

The Valadiers appeared in Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Flint, Baltimore, Washington, and other cities with the top names in R&B. On a memorable show at the Cleveland Arena with Marv Johnson, the Isley Brothers, and Wilbert Harrison, the blue-eyed soul singers received a louder ovation than the Isleys. They enjoyed playing hometown spots like the 20 Grand Lounge and the Graystone Ballroom. Lead, Stuart Avig, a 5'4" dynamo, had a voice that was a cross between Jackie Wilson and Smokey Robinson; his show-stopping voice and demeanor wowed audiences.

The Valadiers' next recordings appeared on the Gordy label, "When I'm Away", "Because I Love Her" and "I Found a Girl". These songs were hits, but neither as successful as Greetings. By 1964 The Valadiers disbanded and lead singer Stuart Avig went on to pursue a solo career. Stuart cut 2 solo tracks at Golden World Records as Stuart Ames, "King For A Day" and "Oh Angelina". After that experience Stuart sang around town in various clubs solo, or as the Valadiers, when he could assemble a group. Coleman concentrated on songwriting; B.M.I. lists 38 songs by him, but he wrote more. His biggest was "If This Is Love (Than I'd Rather Be Lonely)" by the Precisions on Drew Records. He wrote and arranged for Detroit's Top Dog label, owned by Artie Fields, and remained with the company until it folded after 11 single releases. One of Marty's Top Dog songs, "Together We Can Make Such Sweet Music," was redone by both the Spinners and the Supremes & the Four Tops on Motown; Joe Towns recorded the original on Top Dog. When Motown absorbed Top Dog, Coleman fell in as a staff writer, placing tunes with the Originals, Gladys Knight & the Pips, and others. 1n 1989 British music producer Ian Levine came to Detroit to record all of the old Motown stars including The Valadiers. Stuart Avig was the sole original member along with his current group from The Latin Counts. The Valadiers recorded numerous tracks that included remakes of the Spinners' "Love Don't Love Nobody," The Isley Brothers "I Guess I'll Always Love You," as well as "Behind A Painted Smile", "No Competition", "What’s Wrong With Me Baby" and "Truth Hurts". Stuart sounded as good as ever! In 2002 Stuart Avig joined forces with The Shades of Blue who recorded the chartbuster "Oh How Happy". The Shades of Blue along with Stuart have performed all over the country for the past 9 years. In 2009 Motown Records celebrated its 50th Anniversary and after numerous requests from promoters, artists and fans The Valadiers got back together for one last run. Original lead singer Stuart Avig has joined forces with Andy Alonzo (who has been a Valadier since 1980), Donald Revels and Charlie Valverde. --Andrew Hamilton



 "Greetings (This is Uncle Sam), " The Valadiers (1961)



Early Motown evidently had a thing about the letter V.
In addition to the Vandellas (featuring current Detroit
city councilwoman Martha Reeves) and the Velvelettes,
there were the Valadiers. "I don't know what a Valadier
is," Stuart Avig confesses. "I think it had something to
do with being a brave warrior, brave Roman, something
like that. The group was already named that when I
joined it."

That was in the late '50s at Oak Park High School.
According to legend, an integrated version of the group
had previously approached Gordy. "Come back when you're
one color," he reportedly said. They did, and were
signed in late 1959. Avig was only 16. Although a
Pontiac-based instrumental group, Nick and the Jaguars,
had earlier cut a single with Motown, and a handful of
white vocal acts (most notably Rare Earth) would come
aboard in the '60s, "we can legitimately say we were the
first [white vocalists]," he says.

The quartet  --  Avig, Jerry Light, Art Glasser, and
Martin Coleman  --  blended doo-wop with early R&B.
Avig, a dynamic lead singer, was influenced by such
black acts as the Dells, the Flamingos, and the
electrifying Jackie Wilson (a native Detroiter for whom
Gordy had written several hits in pre-Motown days).
"Race relations were different then," Avig says.
"Detroit was a segregated city. We were copying the
black sound, which didn't go over well with everyone. At
Motown, people were professional, but not everybody was
overly cordial or friendly."

The Valadiers' first recordings didn't make it out of
the vault, but in 1961 a song about the draft,
"Greetings (This Is Uncle Sam)," was a minor regional
hit. Avig recalls one show-stopping performance at
Cleveland Arena. "The Isley Brothers were headlining.
They came on after us, and we got a bigger ovation than
they did." After a couple of lackluster follow-up
singles, the group left Motown. Avig received his own
draft notice in 1964, serving two years in the Army.
After his discharge, he gave music another whirl before
marrying and settling into a new career in the
precious-metals refining business.

Today, Avig performs as a member of a blue-eyed soul
group called The Shades of Blue. He remains mostly
upbeat about his Motown experience. "The Four Tops, the
Temptations, the Supremes  --  they were all pushed to
the hilt. As far as promoting us with as much intensity
as they did black acts   I have no complaints. I'll be
forever grateful to Berry Gordy for signing us. He
didn't have to do it.



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posted by u2r2h at Sunday, February 14, 2010

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